Bellarmine News

Beyond the Bluff: Uakea Jose ’18

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Seniors at Loyola Marymount University have been preparing for life after LMU all year. In our Beyond the Bluff series, liberal arts seniors reflect on their post-graduate next steps and the experiences that shaped their career plans.

Uakea Jose ’18
Majors: psychology and communication studies
Next step: Ignatian Service Corps

Uakea Jose has had transformational learning experiences while at LMU and is looking forward to continuing her service and faith formation as an Ignatian Service Corps (ISC) member.

Jose will begin an 11-month term at the end of July serving as a homeless outreach coordinator with the Venice Family Clinic. She’ll also live in an intentional community with other volunteers.

“Ignatian Service Corps’ five pillars of social justice, spirituality, community, simple living, and career and professional development appealed to me because those are all areas in my life that I want to develop and focus on for the next year,” says Jose. “I am also excited to stay LA and give back to a community that has given so much to me.”

ISC is a post-graduate program offered by LMU’s Center for Service and Action and one of its features is mentoring from LMU’s Career and Professional Development team. Jose is optimistic that her service placement as well as special access to career coaching will help her discern future career options.

“An experience I do hope to have is time to reflect on my undergraduate experience, year of service, and career plans,” says Jose. “I hope to grow in the different pillars of the program, and I hope to be challenged by the obstacles that come with developing new skills.”

While at LMU, Jose was involved with Creare Service Organization. For three years, she taught children at a local Catholic School how to play the guitar and ukulele.

A native of Hawaii, Jose hopes to return home someday. One possibility is to serve native Hawaiian families as a marriage and family therapist focused on alternative treatments such as music, art, and sustainability therapy.

“Service is important because it allows people of privilege to learn face-to-face from people who experience inequality on a day-to-day basis,” says Jose. “Service is friendship and solidarity with people who are often forgotten and ignored.”